Fifty Shades of Dispenser


Fifty Shades of Dispenser is a 2012 novel by British author Mr Dispenser. Set largely in the dispensary, it is the first instalment in a trilogy that traces the deepening relationship between a pre-reg pharmacist, Anastacia Amitriptyline, and a Independent pharmacy owner Christian Dispenser. It is notable for its explicit calculation scenes featuring elements of theobroma calculations.
 
The second and third volumes are titled Fifty Shades of pink Simvastatin tablets for fussy patients and Fifty Shades Free of the PJ now I am no longer with the RPS respectively. Fifty Shades of Dispenser has sold around ten copies in Newcastle. Critical reception of the novel has been so so.
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4 thoughts on “Fifty Shades of Dispenser

  1. I do know of a few cases where pre-reg and tutor have ended up in a relationship.

    I was most envious of a pre reg in Sheffield who managed to woo his tutor, who was absolutely stunning in all aspects. She was sadly missed from the single scene.

    BUT… Would this be classed as misconduct (the extra calculation classes after work obviously were a ploy)

  2. I always liked saying the word ‘theobromide’ as if Theo was a tall, thin, and elderly nervous person cloaked in a dark brown chestnut from stockings to snood, and no doubt in a conjugal relationship with puffy dyspeptic Mr. Bromide.

    Of what pharmaceutical purpose is theobroma in the UK? I understood that it was an xanthine like caffeine and theophylline and was a naturally occurring component of cacao. In school, we studied the diuretic, CNS stimulant (and caffeine headache in withdrawals), and cardiovascular effects of xanthines as well as bitterness and issues with overdose such as insomnia, decreased appetite, jitteriness, dehydration and imagine the alkaloid effect on stomach irritation.

    In school we were drilled extensively on xanthine kinetics, but only with familiarization, could we could come up with off the cuff aminophylline drip rates for those in an asthma attack, in the emergency room and then convert to theophylline oral dose prescribed to go home at discharge from the hospital.

    I haven’t seen aminophylline orders for a couple decades, now.

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